Tag Archives: savings

I’m Obsessed With Money And I Still refuse To Play The Lottery.

Every few weeks someone from my office makes the rounds to each cubicle to collect $5 for the PowerBall jackpot. Small talk breaks out at this time and everyone starts fantasizing about leaving their job, sailing around the world, buying sports cars, partying with their friends, etc. Everyone gets jittering with optimistic thinking; “it could happen” or “what if we win?” I mean winning the PowerBall could mean hundreds of millions. (By the way, i’m not talking about the $1 scratch offs your aunt gives you for christmas, you shouldn’t play those either, but they are fun once in awhile.)

I don’t play. When they stop at my desk, I politely decline. I don’t want to hand over my $5 of hard earned money. I won’t win. No one wins. Even if your numbers are chosen and you win the grand prize.

Here are some facts that you should remember when you are fantasizing about what type of mega-yacht you are going to buy:

  • The odds of winning the grand prize are 1 in 195,249,054. This alone should stop you from buying a ticket. My 5th grade math teacher was right when she used to say “The lottery is just a tax on stupid people”.
  • Lottery winnings are taxed like income. When you collect your earnings, you will really only be taking home approximately 1/3 of your stated winnings if you are lucky.
  • 70% of lottery winners spend all their winnings and proceed to lose the rest of their money within seven years. Many end up going bankrupt.
  • The hype is hard to ignore: I’ve heard it so many times “come on dude why not?” or “you’ll be so pissed if we all win..”,  it’s because money adds up. $5 seems small but If you set that 5 dollars you spend on the lottery every month into a money market fund for the next 35 years, you will have an extra $20,000 when you retire.
    • The probability of winning is so low that the certainty of having $20,000 at retirement is a much better payoff with almost no risk.

To me, these are great enough arguing points for not wasting my money on such nonsense.

Say you were lucky enough to actually win the lottery. The problem is that most people would have no idea how to conduct themselves. They are not experienced enough to use their winnings properly or correctly. There are so many implications that could cost you many good parts of the life that you live now.

  • Spending and excitement would become a drug, when dopamine is depleted and the rush is over depression sets in. Your happiness will have peaked and you might not recover. You will keep spending to achieve that same initial rush.
  • You will probably lose friends. People will see you and treat you differently. You will be the rich friend who was just lucky. People will come out of the woodwork to ask you for money. Their personal ATM, “what does he care”. 90% of winners lose good friends.
  • There is nothing better than the feeling of earned money. Money that you win is not money that you personally earned and that is the most defining factor. $30,000 is a lot different to a 30 year old than it is to a 12 year old. When you win the lottery you are the 12 year old. You will most likely make decisions with an immature mind set.
  • There was a study done that shows that poor households, with annual take-home incomes under $13,000, on average, spend $645 a year on lottery tickets, which comes to about 9% of their yearly income.
    • Don’t let this be you. Lottery collections will happen in an office near you, so stop wasting $5!!!

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Mind Over Money

When I graduated in the spring of 2015, I thought I had it all figured out. I had some money saved, a job lined up and an apartment to move in to. College had been a blast, but I felt mature and ready begin my life as a real adult. I was going to succeed and it was going to be a breeze.  

Now, a year and a half later, I sit here writing my first post for my brother’s finance blog. See, I used to think this blog was dumb. I didn’t understand what BeatingBreakEven really meant and always thought my brother was wasting his time talking about money so much. But after switching jobs in June for a salary raise and signing a new lease, for rent that was $200 dollars less a month, I realize I am exactly where he was. I am broke, have no concrete plans for my future and am extremely unsure of myself.

In the past few months I have been thinking a lot about my life and who I want to be. I’ve thought about what to do next in my career, thought about what city I want to move to and thought about how to save more money. I’ve also spent a lot of time contemplating my inner motives, my deepest fears and my varying levels of self esteem. In this process of psychological discovery, I have begun to understand just how powerful our minds really are. They can be our biggest tool for success and the biggest obstacle.

I have started to experience first hand how becoming more aware of my thoughts and psychology can really help me achieve my goals. I mean don’t they say that you can achieve anything you put your mind to? Mastering your mind will not only make you a happier person, but will keep you on track to reaching your long term goals. Since many of my goals are financially based at the moment, I went through last month’s credit card statement to recount my recent purchases. Besides food, almost everything I bought was unnecessary. Nails, makeup, new shoes, drinks at the bar, etc. Practically everything on there were things I bought to feel better about myself. For many of us millennials, our credit card statements are a long list of our deepest insecurities resurfacing as impulsive spending habits. It’s actually pretty scary. Working through my insecurities and understanding the motives behind my purchases has started to help me say no to a lot of things I normally would have swiped for without thinking twice.

If we want to change our spending habits, we first have to change our thoughts. Seems simple and intuitive on the surface, but our minds are really unexplored territory for many young adults. We millennials do not spend enough time understanding our needs, wants and desires and instead, act on impulse as a way to band aid our immediate emotional challenges. We are impulsive because we do not take enough time to think and we spend because we don’t want to feel. We really need to learn how to understand our thoughts and be okay with our emotions, so we can make healthy, logical financial decisions.

3 Resolutions To Get Your Finances In Shape This Year

It’s the start of the year all over again. “New year, new you,” you’ve heard it a million times. Everyone says it. The time to change things around and turn over a new leaf, form better habits and start living a more fulfilled life, or so you think. Everyone wants a strong body, a fit mind, to worry less, love more blah blah blah. Well what about a fit wallet? Maybe this year, it is time to start building a sturdy base for financial success that will carry you through your life. Why don’t you make this year about ramping up your PFS (Personal Financial Statement)? This is the year to start seeing less red and more GREEN. I want to share with you some of the resolutions you should make during this new year that can help you get growing!

First and foremost, save money. I cannot stress this enough. Whether it’s in a savings account, checking account, certificate of deposit, retirement account, 401k, etc. If you are only going to do one thing this year that is going to put you on the path to saving, open one of these accounts. Even if you only have a little to save, just the act will make you feel better about your future. Furthermore, if you can constantly contribute you will soon watch your money grow and mature, your financial self esteem will increase and you will become more proud of yourself and more confident in your ability to save. Start this habit NOW, so it can become second nature.

Dabble in investments. Saving money is important, but it won’t make you rich. You need your money to work for you. This is another crucial process necessary to grow your wealth. You need to make smart investments with your money, investments that will grow and give you good returns in your future. Examples of smart investments include opening a brokerage account for trading stocks, investing in business projects, friends businesses, your passions, land, properties etc. If investing is too scary of a step at this point, do some research! Learning about different opportunities can help you get your foot in the door. Read a book that will increase your knowledge in the subject or ask friends, family and colleagues about their investing experiences. Knowledge is power and the more you know the better your decision will be regarding certain investments. A book I strongly suggest above the others is ‘Rich Dad, Poor Dad’ if you haven’t read it already. It will change the way you think about money and wealth for good.
The last resolution you need to stand by is ridding yourself of impulsive spending. Take control of your money and your wallet. This is by far one of the most important resolutions because it can impact a lot of your everyday decisions. Make a list and take a hard look at what you spend, what you need and what you can live without in 2015. Do you need a Starbucks coffee everyday? How about a $5 breakfast sandwich? Can you bring your own lunch instead of paying $11/day? Do you actually need to buy new shoes every month or go shopping every weekend? Can you save by eating in? Why don’t you try cooking, it might save you money and calories! Why don’t you try fixing things that are broken or torn instead replacing them? Get creative with your life. Learn to create things instead of buying them. You are more able than you think. Don’t buy artwork for your apartment, make your own art. Stop spending money when you don’t have to or can do something for less. As the millennial generation we tend to fix problems by throwing money at them. Learn to take control of your problems and try solving them yourself before you open your wallet or pull out your card. Buy simpler foods, use less resources, buy a bigger blanket and use less heat at night. Become a minimalist and get rid of excess. Only spend money that you have and not money that you borrow. Leave your credit card at home. Once you do this, go back to the first resolution I mentioned and start saving your money!