Tag Archives: banking

The Next Big Thing in Crypto: Asset Tokenization

Last week, I got out of work and I headed over to 3rd ave to the Grant Thornton building to attend a seminar. The event was sponsored by ConsensSys and Balanc3, venture production studios that are focused on building and scaling tools and software products powered by Ethereum. They want to get operating systems around the world using their ethereum platform to innovate and expand business everywhere using Blockchain. I forked over $15 for the ticket because they were serving food and drinks!

The seminar was hosted by the ABC (Accounting Blockchain Coalition), a group whose main objective  is to “educate and empower its members to understand the impact and opportunities that blockchain technology brings to the accounting industry.” I wanted to see how other industries were being impacted by this technology, how they were starting to utilize it, and what this means for business long term. Grant Thornton is not one of the “Big 4” in accounting, but being #6 in the world surely makes them a leader in the industry. They have recently created a subdivision specifically for Blockchain technology and clients of theirs who have started to transact on this currency.

I would like to now summarize some of the main points that I took from the seminar:

Companies are popping up left and right by creating different tokens from the Ethereum open source platform. With these crypto currencies emerging, startups are converting 100% from the start, with protocols that pay employees 100% with crypto currencies instead of regular fiat currencies (dollar, pound, euro), while working on redesigning enterprise resources. One thing that the ABC looks at is how this can affect accounting procedures. One major roadblock will be taxes as people will have to report earnings, in regards to the cost basis and the realized gains and losses. The ABC is set out to help companies and individuals with account for these conversions.

Another point to keep in mind when dealing with digital currencies is that the recorded value of a certain coin is always changing, and therefore must be tracked for use at any given time. That is what the blockchain ledger is for. The value of 10 ETH will fluctuate regularly, so it is very important for accounting to keep track of current value based on a record of prices. Everything purchased needs to be recorded at a certain value so long as we are dealing with multiple currencies (USD/ETH). Things can truly only be streamlined when everything is seamlessly recorded on a permanent ledger. The ledger will help reduce the need for a lot of overhead in the audits.

The next part of the presentation was lead by Balanc3. Balanc3 is like a Quickbooks for the crypto space. They help to maintain a transaction log, similar to a balance sheet, for companies performing regular crytpo transactions. With all transactions recorded in the blockchain ledger, the balance sheet and other financial statements in the program can be constantly updated in real time to give the viewer an accurate representation of the company/token in real time.

Now the main part of the talk/presentation was asset tokenization. This world has a finite number of tangible assets, but there is endless opportunity in the digital space to work with and utilize those assets. Therefore, creators of the Ethereum blockchain have a lot of control. Businesses have started to create tokens and currencies to represent real world assets, in order to trade their value, quicker and easier. When I hear the word “tokens” I picture my 5 year old self at the arcade. In order to play games, I had to cash in  real USD in exchange for the silly arcade tokens that only  worked in the machines. By using these tokens and earning tickets, you had the opportunity to trade their value for prizes. Tokenization is essentially that, the conversion of real tangible and intangible assets to a digital token on a blockchain in order to trade for assets. Assets such as real estate, businesses, art, gold, commodities and many of these assets are hard to split up or convert into shares on a decimal level. Now buyers and sellers of assets trade papers and money that only represent part or all of the asset. Many times there are huge processes involved or red tape that limits access and availability to these assets. Things like paperwork, titles, ownership documents, liens, etc. If we already have the technology such as the blockchain why not switch to digitize the transaction similar to how bitcoin works? Startups, small tech businesses, and even major financial companies are competing to do what bitcoin has done which is basically tokenizing assets similar to what bitcoin did to the fiat currency initially.

There will be a digital footprint of all transactions. In this way fractional pieces of assets can be bought and sold in the form of digital currency or tokens. Transfers will happen quickly on a decentralized platform without the need of a central control.. Ethereum has quickly become the major breeder for tokenization because it was created as an open source platform, allowing businesses to create their own currencies for this specific purpose. Businesses are having “ICO’s” that allow investors to buy in the initial sale of these tokens with their current ETH and the use of “smart contracts”. You can lock in on smart contracts and utilize them for so many different business purposes. These aspects make Ethereum versatile and ready for widespread utilization in the currency marketplace.

 

Soure: http://www.nasdaq.com/article/how-tokenization-is-putting-real-world-assets-on-blockchains-cm767952

 

FOUR Financial Lessons from the Homeless

New York is one of the biggest financial capitals of the world. Finance is everywhere in this city, whether in the billion dollar hedge funds that are making million dollar deals or the restaurant owners calculating bar tabs, brunch receipts or tenants saving for the unruly rent they owe their landlords at the start of each month. 

One lesson I have learned from observing the homeless on my street, is that being a pure minimalist has its benefits. These people carry with them only what they need and nothing more. It would be inefficient to carry around dead, excess weight. We as millennials need to understand why excess is bad and recognize how our spending habits are based on desire instead of necessity. If we all became more aware of the things that we buy and their ability to clutter our lives, we might start to realize that material goods do not help us meet our goals or delay the process.

The second lesson we can learn from the homeless is how we can market ourselves well to attract the attention of others. I regularly encounter homeless individuals on the subways and in the streets. They are holding signs that tell their story or are yelling at passengers about their specific misfortunes. Many of them have had a lot of practice doing this, so they know what works and what doesn’t. They are forced to put their best foot forward and try and try again to sell the bystanders on a few dollars of investment into them. They are essentially pitching themselves to an audience of investors, like you see startups do on Shark Tank. When you want money for an investment or business, or are trying to land the perfect job, you need to market yourself to your best ability. This means looking the part and connecting with the given audience on a personal and real level. The homeless live it everyday. Their survival depends on it.  Since yours doesn’t, if you were to apply the same sincerity and passion into improving your current state, you would likely get very far.

The third lesson is utilizing the resources around you to the best of your best ability. I was in the train station one time and a homeless man was cleaning all of his clothes in the bathroom sink. Since the station is a public facility, this was free to him. He was being resourceful. I also see many homeless people using public places for shelter or the public library for entertainment to pass the time and read or subway seats as beds. We as millennials also have boundless resources around us that will cost us little to no money to utilize things such as books, mentors, the internet, newspapers, other people in our field willing to help us if only we just ask. Many of us do not use these resources to our advantage as we should.

The fourth lesson is that homeless people ask for what they want. If asking doesn’t work with one person, they try and try again. They are relentless because they need to survive. They will badger so many people and most of the time it works. I know because I see so many people fall prey to their tactics and reach into their pockets to grab money. Its human nature to feel empathetic towards other people and want to help them out. Ask for what you want and if you get denied ask someone else.

The final lesson to consider is that homeless people use a cash based accounting model. These days everyone is in debt. Debt is a tool, but most of the time people, especially people our age, abuse this tool. Homeless people collect cash, use that cash and simply go and try to get more when they run out. They don’t just put their purchases on a credit card. People need to realize that we should only spend what we have available. Try carrying around a specific amount of cash each day, spending only what you need and nothing more. Don’t always be putting the little things in life on a credit card because it creates bad habits that are hard to stop.

 

Take Control of Your Financial Future By Paying Yourself First

One of my most memorable lessons from my childhood was when I learned the importance of “paying yourself first.” Many of my peers and friends have complained about their money problems; bills weigh on their mind and they become stressed living paycheck to paycheck. While it is important to stay cognizant of costs and expenditures, too many people make paying their bills their number one priority.This leaves them treading water just to keep their nose out of the water. This is definitely not detrimental, but it will not leave you on top or help you reach your more long term financial goals. I’m here to tell you why it is more important to pay yourself first before paying any bills.

The common routine for many millennials is to set aside money every month for costs, such as rent, transportation, etc. and then treat the leftover money as free spending to blow. Instead, I am suggesting that you first set aside an amount, “personal bill” and then using the rest to supplement bills and other costs. Creating this kind of system will change your mindset about your money. First and foremost you will be saving and secondly, you will be more calculated and thoughtful about how you spend your earrnings. Putting your money in a personal account will prevent you from spending carelessy.

An easy way to start this spending transformation is to go to the bank and open up an account specifically for your savings goal, whether it be a car a house, business or your future. These accounts can be set up so a percentage of your weekly paycheck is directly deposited. This can also be accomplished by setting up a a pre-tax or Roth 401K account. With these types of programs, some of your “extra” money will go directly towards yoru retirement fund that you will be able to acess around the age of 65. As I’ve written about in previous blog posts, a 401k adds a percentage of your paycheck and in many situations your employer will also match your contribution up to as high as 5%.

By focusing on long term financial goals and redesigning your spending/ saving schedule, you can really improve your financial standing. Having a personal account can also bring more security and allow you agency to act on larger investment opportunities that could present themselves in the future. With this mindset, budgeting becomes a crucial component to your life. You should always be adding your savings or “profit” into your weekly and monthly budgets. You want your personal account to be a guaranteed resource you can draw on, so maintenance and continual deposits are crucial. Your other finances will naturally accommodate and adjust for this extra profit and you will in-turn become more intune and financially savvy.

A further benefit to “paying yourself first” is the secondary psychological effects from having saved money. It can be a great feeling to know that you are now controlling your own financial security and this can in-turn guide even more smart choices for how to save and invest money that comes your way in the future.

Why You Need The App Venmo Now

So if you haven’t heard of Venmo, stop reading and look it up right now. What do you think? Every one of us millennials should be using Venmo all the time. Venmo is a practical smart phone app that allows for friend groups to keep track of finances and pay each other back instantly. Venmo is linked directly to a bank account of choice, allowing for rapid money transfers from account to account with a click of a button. Just think about how much easier this will make your life. An app like this takes the awkwardness out of IOU’s and the ‘you owe me this from god knows how long ago’ situations. With Venmo, you can split bill with your buddies, break up grocery costs with your roommates, taxi fare, drinks, dinners, shopping etc. There is even a part of the app that lets you request money owed. This is like a virtual IOU reminder for your friends letting them know how much they owe. Having Venmo is like having electronic cash right in your pocket, and the best part, payments can be accurate, down to the exact cent.

Although Venmo may not directly save you any money, considering the fact that being a mooch is no longer an option, it does allow you to be more responsible with your finances. Another benefit to the electronic component of the payment system is that all transactions are listed on your online banking account website, making spending tracking easy, especially when using mint.com as well or other budgeting resources.

Another great feature of the app is it links to your Facebook account as well. This means that there is a social component to your account as well. With every transaction you are able to send a message or details of the payment that can be posted publicly or kept private. Usually my roommates and I try and one-up each other with how ridiculous and funny we can make our comments. Facebook also makes it easy to find the people you need to pay back because your Facebook are also your Venmo friends.

Venmo will save money in the long run and allow you and your friends to be more stringent. You can keep tabs on your electronic finances. When everyone has the app, paying the bill is only as hard as drunk-texting. And we millennials have gotten very good at that. So go, download this app if you don’t already have it. You won’t regret it.