How The “Little Things” Can Control Your Financial Health As A Millennial

The other day I was in my apartment after a long workday and the Internet was down. Seeing as though I didn’t have much else to do without our beloved muse, I decided to re-watch one of my favorite movies: “Vanilla Sky.” For those of you who have not seen the film (shame on you), Tom Cruise gets in a horrible accident and is left with a deformed face. He must then go through life wearing a mask, reinventing his identity and hiding himself from his former life. The movie ends with a quote that I will never forget, “the little things in life…there’s nothing bigger, is there? In the context of the movie, Cruise’s character was referring to all the little moments in life that add up and can bring you happiness. While this is definitely true, I also think it can be applied in other areas of life, such as your finances! 

It’s the little things expenditures in life that add up and can lead to the biggest sum of debt. It’s the Starbucks, the fast food, the taxi rides, the drinks, the hair products, toothpaste, the gum or the dates that you pay for and buy every week that add up. Compared to more serious investments like your monthly rent, these expenses don’t seem very damaging to your wallet, but over time these costs combined can be very detrimental. 

What’s a couple bucks here and there? A couple of bucks here and there is $3,000, 5,000 or 10,000 dollars worth of small instant gratifications spent over a year. One thing you can do to prevent these small costs from getting out of hand is to plan ahead and budget exactly how much you have spent in the past, over a certain time frame. I’m predicting the results will blow your mind. Just the other day I was looking at some of my daily spending habits. Every day I get breakfast for about $4.50. Multiplied by 261 workdays in a year, I am spending $1,174.50 on a breakfast that could cost me $0.75 if I prepared it for myself at home. Lunch was even more costly, at a daily rate of around $9, meaning I have been spending $2,349 a year. If I cut that down to $3 a day, I could save $1,566 a year. Taking this out of your yearly salary on an annual basis makes that delicious lunch much less tasty. 

Every day I see some of my co-workers take their twice-daily trips to Starbucks. If we are saying on average a Starbucks order costs $3- $4, so x2 can be as much as $7-8. This then equates to $2,088 a year. Is it really the coffee they want? Especially when we have a Kurig machine right in our break room providing the office with FREE COFFEE in over 15 different flavors. Now some of this can be justified with needing a break from work and a friendly ritual with co-workers, but the point I am trying to emphasize is that you should really consider just how necessary these small purchases are in your life or if there are ways you can cut down on your spending with cheaper alternatives. If you want to be financially successful throughout your life you need to always be analyzing your wants over your needs. Do I really need this or do I just want it? 

A good way to counter this mentality is to focus on the why you are spending so much money on these things and if you can do without them in your life. Try to find substitutes if possible with smaller unit prices. If you’re out of college, maybe you want to buy your first car, a trip or a house in the near future. Setting larger goals will help detract from spending so much on the smaller stuff, especially after you have realized just how much every dollar counts. Staying away from instant gratification purchases will make you happier and more successful in the long run. Just remember that its the little things you buy that can be the biggest threat to you’re financial health, so always be aware!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s